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Archive for the ‘DRM’ Category

Canada’s Broadcasters Cry Radio Wolf! Again.

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Funny how Canada’s Broadcasters have launched a public “information” campaign that makes a number of astoundingly false claims about Canada’a proposed copyright bill C-32 that is currently making it’s way through the legislative process.

Big fat lies:

  • Local Radio at risk without Bill C-32
    – Remember CTV’s Save Local TV campaign? Same billshit, only thicker
  • Claims millions of dollars will leave Canada robbing Canadian artists of their fair share
    – Since when did Canadian broadcasters give a shit about Canadian artists. They’ve sent millions lobbying the government for even more ways to screw Canadian artists out of royalties. In 2009 they claimed to have paid Canadian music artists $51 millions dollars on $1.5 BILLION in revenue!
  • Canadian Broadcasters generously shared only 3.4% of their revenue with artists that contributor virtually 100% to their programming!
  • UPDATE:  The Canadian Broadcasters are actually supporting one aspect of C-32 – the elimination of the Broadcast Mechanical Royalty which has been a source of income for Canadian Artists for a decade. The broadcasters FALSE claims that the money goes into the pockets of “Big Recording companies outside of Canada” since up until late 09 there was no such tariff being paid to Master owners. This has been a steady stream of income to artists on Indie and major labels alike.

Check this slice of utter bullshit from the CBA’s website. The graph below is trying to compare the cost of music and “social growth” – whatever the hell that is – to declining radio revenue. I think the decline radio revenue is linked more to shitty programming and the rise of the Internet. To some how try and link radio’s decline to bad copyright laws is pure and simple hokum! And even despite the decline, Canadian radio broadcasters enjoyed revenues over $1.5 BILLION in 2009! Pretty tough slogging eh!

Local radio is in it’s death throws

Anyone who listens to “local” radio which is now mostly owned and by Canadians largest broadcasters or cable companies knows just how desperate they’ve become. Like Canadian television their programming is stuffed to over following with nauseating self promotions and incredibly bad local advertising. Local operations in most markets have become regionalized with only skeleton crews remaining in most markets. But hey, according to the CBA local communities would shrivel and die without local radio!

Canada needs balanced and fair copyright laws that DO NOT allow for vendors to lock down the products we PURCHASE with DRM (Digital Rights Management) locks that Bill C-32 will make ilegal for you to unlock, despite having purchased the product.

I strongly urge every interested Canadian to visit Dr. Michael Geist’s website. Here’s his brief bio from his blog:

Dr. Michael Geist is a law professor at the University of Ottawa where he holds the Canada Research Chair in Internet and E-commerce Law. He has obtained a Bachelor of Laws (LL.B.) degree from Osgoode Hall Law School in Toronto, Master of Laws (LL.M.) degrees from Cambridge University in the UK and Columbia Law School in New York, and a Doctorate in Law (J.S.D.) from Columbia Law School. Dr. Geist has written numerous academic articles and government reports on the Internet and law and was a member of Canada’s National Task Force on Spam. He is an internationally syndicated columnist on technology law issues with his regular column appearing in the Toronto Star and the Ottawa Citizen. Dr. Geist is the editor of In the Public Interest: The Future of Canadian Copyright Law, published in 2005 by Irwin Law, the editor of several monthly technology law publications, and the author of a popular blog on Internet and intellectual property law issues. Dr. Geist serves on the Privacy Commissioner of Canada’s Expert Advisory Board, on the Canadian Digital Information Strategy’s Review Panel, and on the Information Program Sub-Board of the Open Society Institute. He has received numerous awards for his work including the Les Fowlie Award for Intellectual Freedom from the Ontario Library Association in 2009, the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s Pioneer Award in 2008, Canarie’s IWAY Public Leadership Award for his contribution to the development of the Internet in Canada and he was named one of Canada’s Top 40 Under 40 in 2003.

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Written by mattliving

February 26, 2011 at 12:19 pm

India Calls Out ACTA’s True Purpose.

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India was rounding up opposition to the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) and that it wanted to stop the deal from being made outside of existing international institutions. This week, it made good on its promise to object.

The new standards envisioned by ACTA “could short-change legal process, impede legitimate competition and shift the escalated costs of enforcing private commercial rights to governments, consumers and taxpayers, said an Indian representative at the World Trade Organization. “They also represent a systemic threat to the rights of legitimate traders and producers of goods, and fundamental rights of due process of individuals.” (arstechnica)

Thank you India for finally revealing the true purpose of ACTA.

ACTA corporate and media participants will give up almost everything else wrong with ACTA if they can shift the burden of enforcement onto the shoulders of government (you). Not only do they want to completely control who does what at any given moment with their copyrighted material but they want the your government to enforce their copyrights using your tax dollars!

Written by mattliving

June 14, 2010 at 9:59 am

Posted in ACTA, Copyright, DRM

Tagged with , , , ,

Speak Out on Copyright Canada! While You Still Have Something To Save.

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Written by mattliving

August 21, 2009 at 12:22 pm

Hollywood Admits DRM About New Revenue Streams. Not Piracy.

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drmarstechnica: For almost ten years now I have argued that digital rights management has little to do with piracy, but that is instead a carefully plotted ruse to undercut fair use and then create new revenue streams where there were previously none. I will briefly repeat my argument here before relating a prime example of it in the wild.

Access control technologies such as DRM create “scarcity” where there is immeasurable abundance, that is, in a world of digital reproduction. The early years saw tech such as CSS tapped to prevent the copying of DVDs, but DRM has become much more than that. It’s now a behavioral modification scheme that permits this, prohibits that, monitors you, and auto-expires when. Oh, and sometimes you can to watch a video or listen to some music.

The basic point is that access control technologies are becoming more and more refined. To create new, desirable product markets (e.g., movies for portable digital devices), the studios have turned to DRM (and the law) to create the scarcity (illegality of ripping DVDs) needed to both create the need for it and sustain it. Rather than admit that this is what they’re doing, they trot out bogus studies claiming that this is all caused by piracy. It’s the classic nannying scheme: “Because some of you can’t be trusted, everyone has to be treated this way.” But everybody knows that this nanny is in it for her own interests.

Like all lies, there comes a point when the gig is up; the ruse is busted. For the movie studios, it’s the moment they have to admit that it’s (DRM) not the piracy that worries them, but business models which don’t squeeze every last cent out of customers.

bspcommentTold yah so! Seriously, the issue of control of the technology that ultimately controls access to information and knowledge is an issue that is going to have to be resolved in the light of day with public discussion.

It’s this very issue that is driving the Pirate Bay to challenge big media’s right to control not only their their precious content but to control the systems and the technology used to access it. This is also why organizations like the RIAA and the European counterparts have turned to legislators and ISPs rather than deal with their copyright problems in civil court, where it belongs.

It is also the underlying reason why big media, worldwide, is pushing participating countries into signing the Anti-Counterfeiting Treaty Agreement as soon as possible and perferrably WITHOUT any public involvement. The Internet has released a very big and powerful genie from hte bottle of controled media current attempts to stuff the freedom of use and access genie back in the bottle grow larger in scale with every attempt.

Written by mattliving

February 24, 2009 at 8:40 am